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Equation Fahrenheit to Kelvin

April 20, 2013

The Fahrenheit Scale – It was introduced by Fahrenheit and is ordinarily used for clinical and meteorological purposes. On this scale the ice point is marked as 32 degrees and the steam point is marked as 212 degrees. The interval between the two fixed points is divided into 180 equal parts. Each division is called one degree Fahrenheit, and is written as degree Fahrenheit.

The Kelvin Scale or the absolute scale of temperature – Lord Kelvin devised a scale of temperature which is independent of the thermal property of the working substance. This scale is called Kelvin or absolute scale of temperature. The zero of this scale is the temperature at which the molecular motion ceases and average kinetic energy of molecules becomes zero. This temperature is called absolute zero. It is the lowest attainable temperature. No temperature can be less than this temperature. The temperature on this scale is represented by T and the unit is K i.e. Kelvin.

Relation between Celsius and Kelvin Scale

The size of 1 degree on Kelvin scale is the same as the size of 1 degree on Celsius scae i.e., the difference or change in temperature is the same on both the scales. The ice point 0 degree on the absolute scale is 273K and the steam point 100 degree Celsius is 373K. The absolute zero on this scale is thus corresponds to -273 degree Celsius.

Any temperature t degrees on the Celsius scale is equal to (273 + t) on the Kelvin scale.

Conversion of Fahrenheit to Kelvin scale

And, since 100 Centigrade degrees (ice point is marked as 0 degrees and the steam point is marked as 100 degrees).= 180 Fahrenheit degrees

The relation between Fahrenheit and Kelvin scale is given by the formula,
Kelvin = [(°F-32) / (1.8)] + 273.15

For example, convert 80 degree Fahrenheit to Kelvin scale

Kelvin = [(°F-32) / (1.8)] + 273.15
K = [(80°F-32) / (1.8)] + 273.15
K = [(48°F) / (1.8)] + 273.15
K = 26.6°C + 273.15
K = 299.75

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