Skip to content

Petroleum Hydrocarbons

February 11, 2013

Introduction:

Petroleum hydrocarbon (PH) is a word used to denote a large family of several hundred chemical compounds that originally come from the crude oil.  Crude oil is used by mankind to make petroleum products which can contaminate the environment.  Because of the so many different chemicals in crude oil and in other petroleum products, it is not possible to measure each one separately.  However, it is useful to measure the total amount of Total petroleum hydrocarbon at a site.  Some chemicals that may be found in Total petroleum hydrocarbon are hexane, jet fuels, mineral oils, benzene, toluene, xylenes, naphthalene, and fluorene, as well as other petroleum products and gasoline components.  However, it is likely that samples of total petroleum hydrocarbon will contain only some, or a mixture, of these chemicals.

Total petroleum hydrocarbon is a mixture of many different organic compounds.  Everyone is exposed to total petroleum hydrocarbon from many sources, including gasoline pumps, spilled oil on pavement, and chemicals used at home or work.  Some total petroleum hydrocarbon compounds can affect your nervous system, causing headaches and dizziness.  Total petroleum hydrocarbon has been found in at least 23 of the 1,467 National Priorities List sites identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

What are total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH)?

Total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) are a term used to describe a large family of several hundred chemical compounds that originally come from crude oil.  Crude oil is used to prepare petroleum products, which can contaminate the environment.  Because there are so many different chemicals present in crude oil and in other petroleum products, it is not possible to measure each one separately.  However, it is useful to measure the total amount of total petroleum hydrocarbons at a site.

Total petroleum hydrocarbons are the mixture of chemicals, but they are all made from mainly hydrogen and carbon, called hydrocarbons.  Scientists divide total petroleum hydrocarbons into groups of petroleum hydrocarbons that act alike in soil or water.  These groups are named as petroleum hydrocarbon fractions.  Each fraction contains of many individual chemicals.

Some chemicals that may be found in total petroleum hydrocarbons are hexane, jet fuels, mineral oils, benzene, toluene, xylenes, naphthalene, and fluorene, as well as other petroleum products and gasoline components.  However, it is likely that samples of total petroleum hydrocarbons will contain only some, or a mixture, of these chemicals.

How can total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) affect my health?

Some of the total petroleum hydrocarbons compounds can affect your central nervous system. One compound can cause the headaches and dizziness at high levels in the air. Another compound can cause the nerve disorder called “peripheral neuropathy,” consisting of numbness in the feet and legs. Other total petroleum hydrocarbons compounds can cause effects on the blood system, immune system, lungs, skin, and eyes.

Heptane is not a well defined and specified solvent. among  Various  hydrocarbon mixtures are separated from crude oils into a number of solvents having specific boiling point ranges (SBP). They are natural  products of variable composition depending on  crude oil from which they have been fractionated, but having a given boiling point range.  Heptane is more specifically a fraction boils at 43-65°C. Gasoline boils at 40-70°C, pentane boils  at 34-37°C. Higher fractions are hexane 65-69°C, SBP 62/82 boils at 64-72°C, SBP 80/100 boils at 83-120°C.

Animal studies have shown effects on the lungs, central nervous system, liver, and kidney from exposure to total petroleum hydrocarbons compounds. Some total petroleum hydrocarbons compounds have also been shown to affect reproduction and the developing fetus in animals.

Advertisements

From → Uncategorized

Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: